Drug Resistant “Super Bugs”

For several months now I have been taking a teaspoon of black seed oil with my breakfast.

An excerpt from the attached article explains one of the reasons why I will probably take black seed oil for the rest of my life:

“Quite possibly, the most promising research has been done connecting Nigella sativa to multi-drug resistant bacteria. This is a real big deal because these so-called “superbugs” are becoming a significant public health risk.

According to the National Institute of Health: (2) Strains of bacteria and viruses that are antimicrobial-resistant are becoming virtually impossible to treat; including HIV, staphylococcal, tuberculosis, influenza, gonorrhea, candida, and malaria. Between 5 – 10% of all hospital patients develop an infection from superbugs. More than 90,000 of these patients die every year, up from 13,300 patient deaths in 1992. People infected with superbugs typically have longer hospital stays, require more complicated treatment and don’t recover as well.

A study conducted by Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College researchers set out to determine just how potent black seed oil against some of these superbugs and pared it against several antibiotics such as Amoxicillin, Gatifloxacin and Tetracycline. According to the study, “Out of 144 strains tested, most of which were resistant to a number of antibiotics, 97 were inhibited by the oil of black cumin!”

Next to oil of oregano, few things on the planet can boast this type of potency to microbes! The study uncovered that it was especially effective against multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus.

The key to understanding why black seed oils benefits the body in this way is because it is rich in 3 key natural chemicals: thymoquinone (TQ), thymohydroquinone (THQ) and thymol.”

Stop by and check out the six different options of black seed oil that we offer.

Nigella sativa
Nsativa001Wien.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Order: Ranunculales
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Nigella
Species: N. sativa
Binomial name
Nigella sativa
L.
Synonyms[1]
  • Nigella cretica Mill.

Nigella sativa (black caraway, also known as black cuminnigella, and kalonji)[2][3][4] is an annual flowering plant in the family Ranunculaceae, native to south and southwest Asia.

 

Welcome to my new Blog page!

I’ve been studying natural health for over 30 years and a friend of mine finally convinced me to give to my friends, customers and others some of the big pieces of the health puzzle that I’ve discovered.

So read and enjoy… sometimes in plain English and at other times maybe very technical language  – what I’ve learned and observed about a wide range of health topics.